Category Archives: Library Information

The Banned, The Burned, and The Removed!

Early in September  we set up our banned books display…which some of you may have noticed. I hope. It’s fairly modest, but definitely there. Banned books week ran from the 21st-28th. We were a little early in setting up and we’re going keep it up for a little longer in hopes that you’ll pick up a banned book to read Feed your rebel side!!

about 150 books are sitting out there in honor of banned books week because they have been banned or challenged at some point in their “life” since publication. Some were banned almost immediately upon publication, others challenged periodically through the years. Some are banned for obvious reasons while others have nearly outlandish reasons. For a few of the books on the display, we’ve provided you with the main reason for the ban or challenge…but do you want to know what got most of them on the list? You’re in luck! Here is a hefty list of books (many that we’ve got on display) and the reasons they’ve been so persecuted.

Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Challenged at the Baptist College in Charleston, SC in 1987. Why? Apparently people were offended by the “language and sexual references in the book”.

The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger

Perpetually challenged since it’s publication…no fewer than 30 times in the states alone. In 1960 a teacher from Tulsa, OK was fired for assigning the book to an 11th grade English class. While the teacher was reinstated, the book was still removed from the curriculum and the school. Some of the “favorite” reasons for banning the book are: language, sexual content, ‘defamatory to minorities, God, women, and the disabled’, blasphemous, undermines morality, anti-white, and my personal favorite: it’s a “filthy, filthy book”.

Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

This award winner was burned by the East St. Louis Public Library in 1939 because of “vulgar words”. In 1973 Turkish booksellers and publishers were arrested and put on trial for ‘publishing, processing and selling books in violation of an order of the Istanbul Martial Law Command’, those arrested faced a month to six months jail time and had their books confiscated.

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Warren, IN Township Schools challenged the book in 1981 because the book does “deep psychological damage to the positive integration process” and “represents institutionalized racism under the guise of good literature”. Lee’s work is called out often, even today, for it’s language.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Along with 17 other titles, The Color Purple, was challenged by a group called ‘Parents Against Bad Books’ (super creative name, guys…). They opposed its inclusion in Fairfax County, VA elementary and secondary schools, saying that the books “contain profanity and depictions of drug abuse, sexually explicit conduct, and torture”.

Ulysses by James Joyce

Burned in the United States in 1918, Ireland (Joyce’s own country) and Canada in 1922, and England in 1923!

Beloved by Toni Morrison

In 2006 a board member for district 214 in Arlington Heights, IL tried to get Beloved and a few other titles removed from the NW Suburban High School. She was elected amid promises to bring her Christian beliefs into all board decision making and raised the issue for these books based on EXCERPTS she found on the INTERNET. Because everything we read on the internet is true, right?

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Challenged in 1981 at the Owen, NC high school because it is “demoralizing inasmuch as it implies that man is little more than an animal”. You don’t say?

1984 by George Orwell

Challenged in Jackson Co., FL in 1981 because it was “pro-communist”. I wonder if they read the book…

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Banned in France (1956-59), England (1955-59), Argentina (1959), and New Zealand (1960)…because of disturbing sexual content.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

Banned in Ireland (1953), Syracuse, IN (1974), Oil City, PA (1977), Grand Blanc, MI (1979), Continental, OH (1980), and many others. In 1989 it was challenged as a summer youth program reading assignment in Chattanooga, TN. The reasoning: “Steinbeck is known to have had an anti-business attitude” and “He was very questionable as to his patriotism”.

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

Challenged in Snoqualmie, WA (1979) due to several references to women as “whores”

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Removed from classrooms in Miller, MO in 1980 because “it makes promiscuous sex look like fun”.

Animal Farm by George Orwell

In a Wisconsin survey it was revealed that the John Birch Society had challenged the novel because it objected to the words “masses in revolt”. A similar study was done in 1968 by NY States English Council’s Committee on Defense Against Censorship using NY State English classrooms. It was found that Animal Farm had landed on it’s list of “problem books” because “Orwell was a communist”….seriously?

The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

Burned in Nazi bonfires in 1933. Banned in Boston (‘30), Ireland (‘53), Riverside & San Jose, CA (‘60)

As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

Banned in the Graves County school district in Mayfield, KY in 1986 because it contains “offensive and obscene passages referring to abortion and used God’s name in vain”.

A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

First, the June 1929 issue of Scribner’s Magazine, which ran the novel, was banned in Boston, MA. Then, it was banned in Italy (1929) because it is a painfully accurate account of the italian retreat from Caporetto, Italy. Then, burned by Nazi’s in 1933. And finally, challenged in Vernon-Verona-Sherill, NY school district in 1988 as a “sex novel”.

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Challenged for sexual explicitness in Brentsville, VA (1977).

Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison

Challenged in Columbus, OH  school in 1993; the complainant believed the book contained language degrading to blacks.

Native Son by Richard Wright

Removed from Irvington High School in Fremont, CA in 1998 after a few parents complained the book was unnecessarily violent and sexually explicit.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey

In 1975 five residents of Strongsville, OH sued the board of education to remove the novel, labeling it “pornographic” and charged that the novel “glorifies criminal activity, has a tendency to corrupt juviniles, and contains descriptions of beastiality, bizarre violence, and torture, dismemberment, death, and human elimination”. It was banned in 1978 from St. Anthony, ID’s Freemont HS classrooms and the instructor was fired (the instructor sued but a decision was never published).

Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut

BURNED in Drake, ND in 1973! In 1985, it was challenged in the Owensboro, KY high school library because of “foul language, a section depicting a picture of an act of beastiality, a reference to ‘magic fingers’ attached to the protagonists bed to help him sleep, and the sentence: ‘The gun made a ripping sound like the opening of the fly of God Almighty’”.

For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

Declared “unmailable” by the U.S. Postal Service in 1940. In 1973 Turkish booksellers and publishers were put on trial and faced a month to six months imprisonment for “spreading propaganda unfavorable to the state”.

The Call of the Wild by Jack London

Banned in Italy and Yugoslavia in 1929 and then burned by the Nazi’s in 1933.

Go Tell it on the Mountain by James Baldwin

Challenged as required reading in Husten Falls, NY Schools in 1994 because the book has recurring themes of rape, masterbation, voilence, and degrading treatment of women.

The Lord of the Rings J.R.R. Tolkien

Burned in Alamogordo, NM in 2001 outside of Christ Community Church (along with other Tolkien works) as satanic.

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

Burned by the Nazi’s in 1933 because of Sinclair’s socialist views. Also, banned in Yugoslavia in 1929 and in East Germany (as inimical to communism) in 1956.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover D.H. Lawrence

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929), Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959), and Canada (1960-62). Dissemination of the novel was stopped in China in 1987 because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is against the Chinese tradition”.

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

1973, a bookseller in Orem, Utah was arrested for selling the novel. Though charges were dropped, the seller was still forced to close the store and relocate to a different city. The novel was removed from schools in Aurora, CO (1976), Westport, MA (1977), and Anniston, AL (1982) for “objectionable language”.

The Awakening by Kate Chopin

Though published in 1899, the novel was banished for decades because it so disturbed the critics and the public.

The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie

Banned in: Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Somalia, Sudan, Bangladesh, Malaysia, Qatar, Indonesia, South Africa, and India because of its criticism of Islam. It was BURNED in West Yorkshire, England. In Venezuela, owning or reading a copy is considered a crime punishable by 15 months imprisonment.

Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence

1961, the group called “Mother’s United for Decency” out of Oklahoma City, OK hired a trailer, dubbed it the “smutmobile” and displayed books deemed objectionable…including Sons and Lovers.

A Separate Peace by John Knowles

Challenged at Vernon-Verona-Sherill, NY School District in 1980 as a “filthy, trashy sex novel”.

Naked Lunch by William Burroughs

Found to be obscene by Boston, MA Superior Court in 1965.

Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence

Seized by John Summers of the NY Society for the Suppression of Vice and declared ‘obscene’ in 1922.

An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser

Banned in Boston, MA in 1927 and BURNED by the Nazi’s in 1933 becasue it “deals with low love affairs”.

I find it most entertaining that some of these books were banned or challenged when it is very nearly obvious that those complaining or challenging them had either completely missed the point of the book or had not even read it…I’m looking at you, the people who tried to get rid of 1984 because it was “pro-communist”! There are still hundreds and probably thousands of books that have been banned or challenged at some point, including children’s books, but they just didn’t make the cut on this list! Go forth, my readers, and read a banned or challenged book! Be a rebel!

Leave a comment

Filed under Fun Facts, Information, Learn Something New, Library Information, The More You Know...

Moving On…

Moving, Moving, Moving…keep those books a moving! Moving Moving Moving, Rawhide? No, we’re not looking to truly rewrite the lyrics to that most popular tune, but we are certainly moving!

Today began the library’s official move back into the original digs. There was much rejoicing…until we saw just how much we had to move. I recall moving into Avila Hall only a few months ago, but it would appear our humble collection of stuff has grown…considerably. For my own part, the trip that took three bags when we moved in to AH took me six today!

Offices are beginning to take on the “owner’s” personality as we slowly move our packages, boxes, and bags in and unpack.

Tomorrow the real fun begins. The books are a’moving. Hallett, the folks who moved our books out in April will be returning in force to put the books back…sort of. As many of you know, we’ve moved to a closed stacks system, so many of the books will be moved into an alternative space next door. We will, however, be keeping the reference books for both Avila and St. Paul’s, the curriculum & children’s lit., play scripts, some folios, and the easl books in the library. In addition to those, we’ll be creating a section for faculty recommendations. These books are meant to be those a faculty member would like students to have quick access too, but not necessarily as important as those that will be placed on reserve.

As we go through this extensive moving process the library will, unfortunately for some of you, remain closed. A grand total of 10 days has been set aside to allow us to get moved in, set up, and settled before the semester gets going. Our soft opening has been (tentatively) planned for August 21st with a “grand opening” ceremony on the 25th. If you are on campus during our closure and are in need of a computer, please go to Hodes. They are, once again, taking care of our displaced students. They will be open from 8 – 5 on the weekdays.

I realize this blog is a little wee, and doesn’t really give too many details as to what is coming. Maybe we want it to be a big surprise, Eh? So, stay tuned to see what sort of fabulous new goodies we’re bringing you in the new space and to get some information about the move!

Leave a comment

Filed under Library Information, Library Remodel, The Mooooooove

Plotting Sessions

As the fall semester approaches (too quickly, for some) the library & learning commons staff are beginning to plan. It’s never quite safe when the librarians plan…but it’s happening all the same. This year, in a small change of pace, we’re looking for ways to reach out to our campus and community. We want to be more directly involved in your education and entertainment. So…this post is all about some of the ideas being tossed around as we plot.

Completely Infallible and Fantastic Ideas

  • Bring gaming to the library! All kinds of games. Chess and Checkers to Risk and Settlers of Catan. Also, host maker nights for games…create your own game and play it sorts of events.
  • Speed Book Dating or Blind Date w/ a Book evenings. We’ll break out the comfy chairs and maybe a bean bag or two while you and your peers meet some new books. Books will be from the library and from the participants, covered, and have a dating profile styled description. Pick your “match” and sit and read for a bit.
  • Movie night. Pretty self explanatory, eh?
  • Video making contests w/viewing parties. The first of these would be for Halloween. We’ll want you and anyone else you’d like to include to make a halloween video (appropriate of course), submit it to us in some format tba and we’ll have a viewing party to pick a winner. Prizes are also tba.
  • Read In events. As many activists do “sit-in’s”, we may host a read-in event to support reading or banned books week or some such literary holiday.
  • Technology and Researching workshops. We’re adding new technology as fast as we can and trying to keep new and shiny things available to the Avila campus. We are considering hosting workshops in the library on how to use/do certain things. Specifically the video making equipment and software we’re adding to the “yet to be named” presentation room.
  • Scavenger hunts. If we do this, we’re hoping more to participate in a campus wide event. You’d be searching for library artifacts, photographing them, and submitting them to some location.
  • Arts and Crafts time. Everyone like this part of school, yeah? You got to play with scissors and glue and markers and crayons. It’ll be just the same but a little more library or book related. In the spring we put out coloring sheets and crayons & markers for you guys to play with. Some were definitely enthused, more were either unaware, didn’t care, or were too busy cramming. We’d like to do this some more, and build on it.
  • Book Club. Yep, a literal book club where we pick a book, everyone reads it, and we discuss.
  • Webcasts, webinars, and Tweetchats. A wide range of topics from pop culture to how to use the computers. We’re going to try to be all over the internet trying to be of use to the Avila population.

Do any of these ideas sound like something you would be interested in? Is there something you would like to see on this list? Are any of these ideas so lame you want to facepalm with a brick? Please let us know! We’re looking for feedback from the community as a whole to make YOUR library a place you enjoy and want to be. 🙂

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Information, Library Information

National Library Week!

The week of April 13 – April 19, 2014 is National Library Week!

One week each year, usually in April, since 1958, libraries throughout the nation have held celebrations ranging from simple posters to all out parties to celebrate all that they have to offer (staff, materials, “spaces”, etc.) as well as supporters and patrons. The celebration was developed by the National Book Committee, which was made up by members of the American Library Association (ALA) and the American Book Publishers. In 1974 the National Book Committee was disbanded and ALA took over full sponsorship. The original committee created the celebration with the goals of: “encouraging people to read in their increasing leisure time”, “improving incomes and health”, and “developing a strong and happy family life”. The goals set forth by the ALA may have changed a bit in the ensuing decades since National Library Weeks’ birth, but the original goals still hold true.

As a part of the annual celebration the ALA assigns a  different theme to each year. Typically these themes deal with trends (library, community, global, political, etc.), promoting library services, reading, or literacy. The very first library week was themed “Wake Up and Read!”. This year the theme is “Lives change @ your library ®.”

Each library celebrates differently, of course. I’ve seen as little as a small poster on the circulation desk and as much as a week long, fun filled schedule of events all culminating with a party on Saturday (the last day) providing free food and drinks as well as games and prizes to any and all who wish to attend. Many libraries change their events to match the annual theme and frequently will gear their parties, games, etc. to children. In the last few years there has been a trend of promotions for teens and young adults, so I would expect to see more programs…particularly “maker” or “tinker” programs…aimed at that age group. On that note, the rise in popularity of the “maker” movement has prompted libraries, mostly public, to create “makerspaces” where patrons can basically work to create new things either from new bits & pieces (like a 3D printer) or by breaking apart old items (like toys, computers, fans, etc.) and using the salvageable bits. With these new spaces, there could be a variety of programs aimed to promote those spaces. This year, I expect to see a lot of programs asking patrons to share their life changing library stories or promoting using the library to help change lives (like creating an artificial hand with a 3D printer).

To promote this year’s theme, @YourLibrary (a library and literacy support community), has started a drawing for a Kindle Fire. Want to enter? Just take a selfie and share it with a story of how libraries have changed your life, or what libraries mean to you. Share your photo and story on Twitter, Facebook, or Flickr using the hasgtags “#LivesChange” and “#NLW14” before noon on Friday, April 19th. If you want more details or to use the funky speech bubble created just for National Library Week this year, click here! Here at Avila’s library, we have set out some copies for use!

Non-libraries get into the party as well. Different book publishers, library support groups, and technology companies will host online webinars, host events, or even offer some of their useful services for free! This year Oxford University Press has made their online resources free for the week! Just use “libraryweek” as both username and password and enjoy!

SO! Tell your story, take a selfie and remember to appreciate your library and librarians for all that they do and have done in your life. If you’d like to help your library celebrate, just stop by and see what programs they’ve got set up for the week! If you’d like to show your appreciation to your Avila University librarians, just stop by and say thanks…we also accept candy. 🙂 keep calm and library on

Leave a comment

Filed under Fun Facts, Holidays, Information, Library Information

The mooooooove [early warning]

The library move is coming. *Cue menacing music*

I’m guessing some of you lovely readers are confused by this. To clear the confusion: The library will be undergoing a renovation/remodel beginning late in the Spring ‘14 semester. In order to continue serving the campus we have opted to relocate until the remodel is complete (August 1st, at this point). Here are all the details we have currently:

  • The library will close March 30th (Sunday) to begin moving to our “Summer home”.
  • We will reopen April 7th (Monday).
  • At this point, our hours of operation are up for discussion.
  • During the full period of the remodel (March 30th – August 1st) the Avila circulating collection, periodicals, the Curriculum & Children’s collections, and play scripts will be unavailable for use.
  • St. Paul’s School of Theology’s collection will be moved to our new home, per an agreement with them. These materials will remain available during the remodel.
  • Hooley-Bundschu Library will be relocating to Avila Hall (first floor) for the duration of the remodel.
  • We will release updated spring and summer schedules as they become available.
  • There is a possibility of a change to building/library access during our stay in Avila Hall. Please stay tuned for updates!
  • Reference and Reserve materials will remain available in our temporary Avila Hall home.
  • Faculty: If you need to place any materials on reserve for the final weeks of the Spring semester or for any Summer classes, you must do so by March 15th. Please contact Becky Nichols (x2428) with requests and questions.
  • Mobius and Interlibrary Loan lending will remain available through the remodel.
  • Materials will be delivered to our temporary location for pick up.
  • If you need assistance requesting materials, please do not hesitate to ask any of the library staff!
  • Also making the move: Most (if not all) of our computers, printers, the archives, and the library staff.
  • Locations of these items and offices are still in flux. We will post a “map” of locations once the areas have been finalized.
  • Our temporary location at Avila Hall will still allow us to have a kitchen area, the computers will have internet access, and WiFi should be available. We are also considering setting up a quiet study area/room if space is available.
  • All databases and e-books will remain available throughout the remodel. These can also be accessed off campus, using your Avila login information.

If you would like further explanation or have questions, feel free to comment here (or through Facebook or Twitter), e-mail, call, or stop by the library.

Leave a comment

Filed under Library Information, Library Remodel, The Mooooooove

Snow Day!!

Just a quick update for my Avila University readers: Avila’s campus will be closed tomorrow! Everyone stay safe and enjoy your free day! If you must go out, be safe and prepared! I will do my best to keep you posted on any updates or changes to schedules for Wednesday! image

Leave a comment

Filed under Information, Library Information

Mobius…books from beyond!

Mobius (mow-bee-us)…it’s an odd word isn’t it? It’s an odd word, but one that could be incredibly useful to you when you’re working on research projects. Mobius is the statewide consortium (of which Avila is a part) that works with libraries to offer discounted database and periodical subscriptions as well as creates an enormous lending network for all members. So what does this mean for you? Well, it means that we can provide you with more and better options for locating articles and WE CAN GET YOU BOOKS FROM ALL OVER THE STATE!

The Mobius consortium membership includes the majority of colleges and universities in Missouri as well as many public and special libraries. Each library is assigned a “cluster” based on geographic location and tends to work more closely with their cluster libraries. Avila is a part of the Kansas City cluster, so we work closely with (and can get materials pretty quickly from) universities, colleges, and some public libraries in the area (UMKC, Rockhurst, KC Public Library, etc.).

If you happen to need a book that we do not have access to at Avila, Mobius is going to be  your way to (hopefully) get a copy of that book. To get these books, your first task is to make sure Avila doesn’t already have a copy of it by searching here. If your search comes up blank, your next step should be to check the KC cluster options, which is here. Still nothing? Now you will have to check the full Mobius catalog, here.

In all of your basic searching options, you can search by title, author, subject, or journal/magazine. As always, if you search by author you need to put the last name first. If your search leads you to the full Mobius catalog, you will have more options for the basic search. In any of the searches, you are welcome to opt for the “Advanced Search”, which will help you narrow search results that are broad.

When requesting books, you will need to have your “user ID”. At Avila your user ID is your last name, first initial, middle initial, and your zip code (ex: A person named James A. Grant living in this area would be: grantja64145). If you have any problems requesting materials, you will need to contact the library or stop by the circulation desk.

When you request a book, it will be sent to your “home” library (at Avila, it will be the campus library), but you can also have them sent to other libraries within your cluster if they are more convenient for you. This ability makes mobius a fabulous and relatively quick way for students, faculty, community members, etc. to find information that is not currently available at their local/preferred library.

If you need help requesting materials, or with any step of the process, please feel free to ask any of your friendly neighborhood librarians. Also, you are welcome to ask me any questions in the blog comments or through our Facebook and Twitter (@HooleyBundschu) accounts.

1 Comment

Filed under Information, Library Information, Research Help, The More You Know...

Brief Explanation of the Interlibrary-Loan Process

Do you have a big ‘ole research project due this semester? Already doing major research and found an article that will be useful to you, but we don’t have access to it? You’re in luck! Avila University’s Hooley-Bundschu Library participates in the OCLC community, and therefore can request books and articles from lending libraries across the nation.

If you wish to “request” a book or article which you’ve found, you’ll need to go here and perform a search for your book or article to ensure that at least one lending library in the U.S. has a copy available. Next, you will need to go here and fill out the request form. As you fill it out, be sure you have included your e-mail address, as this is how we will contact once the materials have arrived and how articles will be delivered (you will receive a PDF or similar document type).

If you have been searching in an Ebsco database and located a document which is not available in full text through any of our databases, click the link that looks like this:

Request this item through Interlibrary loan

Once there, fill out all relevant information and in the “Cost Not To Exceed” section, mark it as $0.00. Once again, it is essential that you provide your e-mail address, as this is how the majority of articles will be delivered. Your library card # is your student ID#. Once all information has been filled in, click submit and a generated request will be sent.

ILL is a great option for students working on large research projects, particularly those looking for obscure materials. Unfortunately, we cannot guarantee that your request will be accepted, nor can we give you a specific time frame for delivery. ILL (Interlibrary Loan) articles could be delivered next day or over a week later; ILL books usually arrive within about a week, but could take longer depending on the location and speed of the lending library.

If you need help requesting materials, or with any step of the process, please feel free to ask any of your friendly neighborhood librarians. Also, you are welcome to ask me any questions in the blog comments or through our Facebook and Twitter (@HooleyBundschu) accounts.

Leave a comment

Filed under Fun Facts, Information, Learn Something New, Library Information

First!

Hooley Bundschu Library has a blog! Hooray!!

As this is the very first post I’ll keep it simple and just update you on some of the goings on here at the library.

First and foremost, we are rapidly approaching the end of the Fall 2013 semester, which means FINALS. Students are flocking to our computers and study spaces to finish projects, perfect papers, and get in those last few minutes of studying. For any students or faculty who are looking for information and/or help–don’t be afraid to ask your friendly neighborhood librarians! We can be found wandering all over the library and are happy to help. You are also welcome to ask questions via Twitter (@hooleybundschu) or Facebook. Also, it can get fairly noisy in here with this many people working, so those of you hoping for a “silent” study space, I suggest you investigate our quiet study area toward the back of the library. We also have a few small study rooms, which are first come-first serve (sorry, no reservations).

In an attempt to make your last week before finals a little less stressful, a variety of campus groups will be hosting events this week in the library and around the Avila campus. If you are in need of some stress relief, check the schedule of events on our Facebook page.

We recently hosted the ‘Free LaMar’s Donuts and Coffee’ event at the library as a part of Avila’s “Stress Relief Week.” This year we were able to take advantage of a special ‘BOGO’ deal with LaMar’s and received 50 dozen (600) donuts. We started serving at 8:00 A.M. and were still going strong when the evening shift came in at 5:00 P.M. A Huge thanks to LaMar’s Donuts and Avila Student Life for making this event a huge success.

With the advent of “Stress Relief Week” and the fast approach of Finals Week, the library will have extended hours. Check the image below for daily hours. The library will be closed December 14th & 15th and will re-open on the 16th with abbreviated hours until the official Christmas Break begins on December 23rd. Check back for details.

Finally, we are looking for donations! Specifically, we are looking for TOYS. As a part of a campus wide Toys for Tots drive, Hooley Bundschu Library will be collecting new and unopened toys to be delivered to needy children for Christmas. If you are interested in donating there are two collection bins inside the library, near the circulation desk. The bins should be available through the end of the school year and you are welcome to donate any time the library is open!

I will leave you with those thoughts for now. Check back soon for a new post and GOOD LUCK to all students preparing for Finals!!

Stress and Finals Weeks Schedule

Stress and Finals Weeks Schedule

Leave a comment

December 4, 2013 · 5:37 pm